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Posts Tagged ‘prison’

COSTAATT Use of Force Seminar.

In prison abuse, restorative justice on October 31, 2014 at 8:58 am

On 30th October, 2014 the College of Science, Technology and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAATT) staged the final of its 2014 public seminars. The seminar focused on the thorny issue of “use of force” by persons in the Police and Prisons Services of Trinidad and Tobago.

The seminar was hosted by COSTAATT’s Department of Criminal Justice and Legal Studies which is the successor body to the Joint Services Staff College (JSSC). The JSSC was established in 1978 and tasked with ensuring that members of the protective services and Defence Force had the necessary professional and technical competencies to manage the agencies which fell under their purview.

Organised by Department Chair, Kirwin Pyle-Williams and moderated by lecturer, Wayne De Landro the seminar took the form of a 6-member panel discussion addressing various aspects of the use of force by police officers, prisons officers and the impact such incidents had on the community, with particular focus on the “crime hotspot” communities of Sea Lots and Laventille.

Panellists included Acting Inspector Espinoza of the Police Service who sits on the Use of Force Committee; Ms. Margaret Sampson-Browne of the Victim and Witness Support Unit; Retired Superintendent of Prisons Martin; CURB President and Attorney-at-Law Adrian Alexander; Criminologist Renee Cummings and Community Activist Hal Greaves.

The presentations were thoroughly researched, professionally delivered and well received by the audience which comprised mainly students of the Department of Criminal Justice and Legal Studies from the various COSTAATT campuses.

CURB’s Adrian Alexander was asked to address the issue of Use of Force in Juvenile Detention facilities and was able to outline to the audience the provisions of the Prisons Rules and the Young Offenders Detention Act and Regulations which cover disciplinary offences and punishments for young male offenders at the Youth Training Centre.

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He compared these provisions with subsequent international instruments such as the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, the 1990 UN Havana Rules for treating with Juveniles Deprived of their Liberty and the 2008 European Union Guidelines of a similar nature.

In plotting a way forward to bring the Young Offenders Detention Act into the 21st century, Mr. Alexander urged for a phased approach. He advocated for the recruitment and training of officers specifically in youth development, equipping such officers with skill sets to enable them to facilitate restorative justice initiatives to address disciplinary offences which may arise at the institution, and allowing the officers time to master those skill sets by having a parallel system of restorative justice alongside the current punishment structure before phasing out the latter.

During the Question and Answer segment, Mr Alexander was asked why he thinks the restorative justice philosophy had not taken root with the public in Trinidad and Tobago to a great extent.

He replied that the recent Restorative Justice Conference revealed the degree to which there had been a grave misunderstanding of the meaning of key terminology wherein restorative initiatives were mislabelled as restorative justice initiatives. He highlighted that true restorative justice is victim centred and the public would be more responsive to that as a selling point than the past strategies of touting restorative justice principally as a means to reduce crime and re-offending.

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TT Man Prefers Death Than Jail

In prison abuse on April 4, 2008 at 3:52 am

On Thursday 27th March, 2008 an accused whose bail was revoked by a Trinidad magistrate pleaded with the magistrate not to sned him to jail for fear of being stabbed to death.

When Randy Mason saw that his plea fell on deaf ears, he slammed his head three times into the wooden walls of the courtroom and shouted that he rather die than return to jail.

CURB recalls that similar pleas by a youth a few years ago were followed by a completed suicide after he was remanded to the Youth Training Centre. It is alleged that the youth in that case may have been the victim of repeated sexual assault and abuse in custody.

We hope that the prison authorities place Mr. Mason on a more effective suicide watch than that provided last year to Richard Alexander who hanged himself in custody in 2007.

We urge them to provide Mr. Mason with professional mental health care to ascertain the basis of his fears and a thorough medical examination to detect any evidence of physical assault or sexual abuse.

Belize Police Charged for Beating Prisoner

In prison abuse on March 30, 2008 at 10:41 am

In Belize, prisoner Kevin Dawson has alleged that two police officers beat him with clubs while he was being held in a cell at the Queen Street Police Station.

Dawson, who was recently recaptured after he escaped lawful custody earlier this month, sustained injuries to his face, head, leg and arms.

The two officers, police constables Alister Casey and John Myvette were charged with Wounding and arraigned in Court where they pled not guilty. Both were released on $1,000.00 bail and are to re-appear before the Magistrate’s Court on 7th May, 2008.

Media in Belize have quoted Assistant Commissioner of Police, Allen Whylie, as saying that the two officers will almost certainly face disciplinary charges from the Police Force of Prejudice as well as Unwarrantable force to a prisoner in custody.

Delay in Antigua Prison Sexual Assault Report

In sexual abuse, sexual assault, Uncategorized on March 30, 2008 at 10:24 am

In Antigua, allegations of sexual harassment at Her Majesty’s Prison (HMP) are being investigated by an independent committee established in early February, 2008 by the Ministry of Justice and Public Safety.

The allegations were made against Eric Henry, superintendent of Her Majesty’s Prison, by several female prison officers. Recently, however, similar allegations have been levelled against a few male prison officers.

The committee comprises Chairperson Rosa Lee, Bishop Kingsley Lewis, Sheila Roseau, director of the Directorate of Gender Affairs and Joan Moses, the committee’s secretary.

Initially the committee was to have submitted its report on 29 February 2008. However, an extension was granted to 31 March 2008. According to Minister Derrick, a press conference will be held subsequent to the release of the report, at which time the members of the committee will discuss their findings.

Henry has had these allegations levelled against him since July, 2007 but it was only in January, 2008 that several female officers spoke out to the media and alleged that they were propositioned by the prison superintendent.

CURB hopes that justice is done in the aftermath of this investigation and encourages the Antigua media as well as Minister Derrick to initiate an inquiry as to whether prisoners in Antigua have also experienced sexual assault and abuse from male prison officers.

Inmates represent a voiceless population and may well have endured similar or worse assaults but do not have the ear of the media to ventilate their woes.

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